Le groupe sanguin permet de savoir à qui vous pouvez donner du sang et de qui vous pouvez en recevoir. Il existe huit groupes sanguins principaux qui sont la combinaison de deux systèmes : le système ABO (A, B, O, AB) et le système rhésus (positif ou négatif). Il s’agit des groupes sanguins suivants : O positif, O négatif, A positif, A négatif, B positif, B négatif, AB positif et AB négatif.

A-positive

A-positive blood is the second most common blood type in Canada — 36% of Canadians share this blood type.

Patients who are A-positive and AB-positive can receive A-positive red blood cells and platelets. Maintaining an adequate supply is crucial.

A-negative

A-negative blood is one of the rarer blood types — only 6% of Canadians share this blood type.

A-negative blood type contains red blood cells that can be used to save patients with A-negative, A-positive, AB-negative and AB-positive blood types — almost half of all Canadians.

B-positive

This blood type is the third most recurring blood type in Canada — only 7.6% of Canadians share this blood type.

B-positive red blood cells can be given to B-positive and AB-positive patients.

B-negative

B-negative blood holds tremendous power — only 1.4% of Canadians share this blood type.

B-negative red blood cells can be used to help patients with B-negative, B-positive. AB-negative and AB-positive blood types — nearly 12% of the population.

AB-positive

AB-positive patients can receive red blood cells from donors with any blood type and 2.5% of Canadians share this blood type.

Donors who are AB-positive are considered the universal plasma donors because this blood component can be transfused to any patient, regardless of their blood type.

AB-negative

AB-negative blood can receive red blood cells from donors with any other Rh negative blood type — only 0.5% of Canadians share this blood type.

Donors who are AB-negative are the universal platelet and plasma donors because these blood components can be transfused to any patient.

O-positive

This is the most common blood type in Canada — 39% of Canadians share this blood type.

O-positive red blood cells can be used to treat any patient with a positive Rh blood type, which makes a measurable difference in emergency situations.

O-negative

Only 7% of Canadians share this blood type — a small percentage with a huge impact.

O-negative red blood cells are compatible with all other blood types. This means that in critical emergencies — when there is no time to confirm a patient’s blood type — O-negative blood can make a lifesaving difference.