Stem Cells

University of Alberta’s Timothy Caulfield receives James Kreppner Award


Tuesday, May 14, 2019

The 2018 Canadian Blood Services’ James Kreppner Award has been awarded to Timothy Caulfield, professor and research director in the Health Law Institute at the University of Alberta.   

Valued at $50,000, the award will support Professor Caulfield’s project to analyze the marketing practices of private cord blood banks, assess their claims, and consider how regulatory tools can help ensure services marketed are done in a scientifically informed and evidence-based manner.    

Image
Canadian Blood Services' James Kreppner Award awarded to Timothy Caulfield

“The entire Health Law Institute team is thrilled about this award, and we truly appreciate the opportunity to dig into the complex issues associated with donation, blood products and policy development,” says Professor Caulfield. “The research seems both timely and needed. We are lucky to have an award of this nature and hope our work will reflect James Kreppner's fearless analysis of controversial issues.”  

James Kreppner was a former board member of Canadian Blood Services, a lawyer, and a strong advocate for patients’ rights and blood safety. He suffered a severe form of hemophilia-A – a genetic disorder that makes it difficult for blood to clot, and his condition often required transfusions of blood products. In 1985, he became infected with HIV and hepatitis C through tainted blood products.  

Mr. Kreppner became a key figure in establishing the public inquiry into contaminated blood and testified twice before The Krever Commission. He was also a long-time volunteer and member of the Canadian Hemophilia Society before his passing ten years ago on May 14, 2009.   

This annual award named in his honour supports one high-quality research project that explores legal and policy questions relevant to the products and services provided by Canadian Blood Services. The award’s research priorities include the legal and regulatory aspects of (a) donation, collection, storage, and use of blood, blood products, and hematopoietic stem cells; and (b) organ and tissue donation and transplantation.   

Through a series of funding programs and research collaborations, the Canadian Blood Services’ Centre for Innovation conducts and supports research in key priority areas, including projects that span the translational continuum from “bench to bedside.”  

The 2019 competition for the James Kreppner Award will open for applications in Fall 2019 and will support one project with up to $50,000 for a period of one year.   

Find out more about current and past James Kreppner Award program projects:  

Further reading:  


Canadian Blood Services – Driving world-class innovation

Through discovery, development and applied research, Canadian Blood Services drives world-class innovation in blood transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation—bringing clarity and insight to an increasingly complex healthcare future. Our dedicated research team and extended network of partners engage in exploratory and applied research to create new knowledge, inform and enhance best practices, contribute to the development of new services and technologies, and build capacity through training and collaboration.

The opinions reflected in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Canadian Blood Services nor do they reflect the views of Health Canada or any other funding agency.

Nominations now open for the 2019 Canadian Blood Services Lifetime Achievement Award


Monday, May 13, 2019

Do you know someone who has made an outstanding contribution to the blood system in Canada?   

Who can be nominated?  

Recipients of the Canadian Blood Services Lifetime Achievement Award are individuals whose landmark contributions are recognized as both extraordinary and world class in the field of transfusion or transplantation medicine, stem cell or cord blood research in Canada and/or abroad. 

To be nominated for the Canadian Blood Services Lifetime Achievement Award, an individual must have contributed significantly to improving the safety and/or quality of blood, blood products, stem cells and/or cord blood or has made noteworthy improvements or advances in transfusion or transplantation medicine practice. Their record of publication should be of significance and their professional reputation should be aligned with the goals and reputation of Canadian Blood Services, reflecting a quality culture driven by excellence. 

The award will be presented on September 23, 2019 in Ottawa at the annual national Honouring Canada’s Lifeline event where we honour our donors, volunteers, peer recruiters and partners from across the country and across our products for their outstanding dedication and achievements. 

 

What's the nomination process? 

Nomination requirements 

  • Provide a short introduction and summary in 150 words or less of the nominee’s contribution to improving the safety and/or quality of blood, blood products or stem cells, or contribution to advances in transfusion medicine practice. 
  • Present a brief biography including academic, research, clinical and administrative positions, awards or recognitions. 
  • Outline how the work of the nominee is set apart from the work of others in the field. 
  • Provide a nominee’s full current curriculum vitae and contact information for the nominee including full name, mailing address, telephone number(s) and email address. 
  • Provide name and contact information for the nominator(s). 

Note: Candidates should be unaware that they have been nominated for this award. 

Submit nominations in writing to the address below:  

By mail:  

Canadian Blood Services Lifetime Achievement Award Nominating Committee 

c/o Dr. Isra Levy, Vice President, Medical Affairs and Innovation 

Canadian Blood Services 

1800 Alta Vista Drive 

Ottawa, Ontario K1G 4J5 

By email:  

isra.levy@blood.ca    

 

Submission deadline: May 30, 2019 

The nominator of the awardee, and the nominee selected, will be notified by the end of June 2019. 

 

Past honourees 

The Canadian Blood Services Lifetime Achievement Award came into existence in 2002. To date, the Canadian Blood Services Board of Directors has selected the following individuals for this prestigious award: 

• Dr. John Bowman, 2002 

• Ms. Marie Cutbush Crookston, 2002 

• Dr. Morris A. Blajchman, 2003 

• Dr. Peter Pinkerton, 2004 

• Dr. John Freedman, 2006 

• Dr. Hans Messner, 2007 

• Mr. Justice Horace Krever, 2008 

• Dr. Gail Rock, 2009 

• Dr. Victor Blanchette, 2010 

• Dr. Allen Eaves and Dr. Connie Eaves, 2011 

• Dr. Celso Bianco, 2012 

• The Canadian Hemophilia Society, 2013 

• Dr. John Dossetor, 2013 

• Dr. Gershon Growe, 2014 

• Dr. Bruce McManus, 2015 

• Dr. David Lillicrap, 2016 

• Nancy Heddle, 2017 

• André Picard, 2018 

  

Image
2019 Canadian Blood Services Lifetime Achievement Award

Canadian Blood Services – Driving world-class innovation 

Through discovery, development and applied research, Canadian Blood Services drives world-class innovation in blood transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation—bringing clarity and insight to an increasingly complex healthcare future. Our dedicated research team and extended network of partners engage in exploratory and applied research to create new knowledge, inform and enhance best practices, contribute to the development of new services and technologies, and build capacity through training and collaboration. Find out more about our research impact.

Competition winner: Optimizing Cord Blood Donor Recruitment


Thursday, April 18, 2019

Dr. Jennie Haw's prize-winning entry in our Lay Science Writing Competition describes research underway to optimize cord blood donor recruitment for the national, public cord blood bank. 

A Canadian Blood Services’ Cord Blood Bank (CBB) collection specialist waits outside a hospital labour and delivery room for a woman to give birth. Sometimes she can hear the newborn cry and when she does she knows that a hospital nurse will soon push through the delivery room doors and hand her a carefully labeled plastic bag containing a still-warm placenta and cord. Once she receives this bag, she quickly pushes the cart to a collection room and begins a finely-timed and orchestrated sequence of steps to extract as much cord blood as possible. Cord blood (the blood remaining in the placenta and cord) contains powerful blood stem cells that can regenerate into any cell in the body’s blood system making these cells an effective treatment for diseases such as leukemia and anemia. The potential to provide stem cell transplants for waiting patients in Canada, and globally, depends on women deciding to donate cord blood.  

Since 2015, the CBB has been recruiting, collecting and banking cord blood units from donors in four collection-site hospitals across Canada (Ottawa, Brampton, Edmonton, and Vancouver). Effective donor recruitment is critical to building a robust inventory of cord blood units that meets the needs of patients. As the CBB works to build its inventory, important questions regarding donor recruitment remain.  

Why do some women donate cord blood while others don’t? What are donors’ experiences of recruitment and donation? What’s important to women? What does donating cord blood mean to donors and potential donors? How can donor recruitment processes be optimized? Working together with Dr. Dana Devine (Chief Scientist, Canadian Blood Services) and Dr. Jessica Polzer (Associate Professor, Western University), these are some of the questions guiding my research project aimed at optimizing donor recruitment for the CBB.  

Very few researchers have examined cord blood donors and recruitment. In one study, researchers found that information and reminders about cord blood donation provided at specific times during a woman’s pregnancy could prompt her to donate. These findings are promising, but the researchers also wrote that any positive effects of these recruitment prompts could be minimized by the broader context in which cord blood donation happens. 

As a sociologist, I take the view that nothing in the social world happens in a vacuum. People (and organizations) don’t make decisions or act independently of the broader context within which they live and act. Context includes people, organizational structures, ideas, assumptions, norms, and even the physical environment. Qualitative research methods (data are words and not numbers) are an effective way to learn about people and processes within their specific context. Using these methods, my study generates data through in-depth, one-on-one interviews with people in the “real world” who are best positioned to answer my research questions.  

In Phase 1 of my project (2018), I conducted collection site visits and interviewed CBB collection site staff (from all four collection sites) and managers of the CBB. I wanted to understand, in detail, how the CBB operates, and the donor recruitment and cord blood collection processes. Donor recruitment is only one part of a larger CBB system. So, to optimize donor recruitment, it’s necessary to understand how the larger system operates.  

Results from these interviews demonstrate that donor recruitment processes are complex and involve multiple people operating within different organizational frameworks (e.g. hospital, CBB), often with different goals and priorities. Our findings confirm the importance of context to donor recruitment and identify influential contextual factors that we categorized into: birthing context (e.g. women’s birthing expectations, women’s physical status), hospital context (e.g. relationships between hospital and cord blood staff, physical layout of the hospital), CBB organizational context (e.g. hours of operation, consent process), and sociocultural context (e.g. language, belief systems). Our results make an important contribution to building an evidence base of contextual factors to consider in cord blood donor recruitment. By publishing these results we’re able to share this evidence with other cord blood banks. 

In Phase 2 (2019), I’ll interview donors and potential donors to the CBB to better understand cord blood recruitment and donation from their perspective. Through in-depth interviews with women who have donated and may donate, I’ll generate data about their experiences with cord blood donation, their reasons for donating (or not), what information is important to them when considering cord blood donation, how they came to the decision to donate (or not), and what cord blood donation means to them. Through detailed systematic study of women’s perspectives, we can add to our understanding of the complex recruitment puzzle and provide recommendations to the CBB. 

Optimizing donor recruitment processes will contribute to building a robust cord blood inventory, strengthening the stem cell transplant system, and increasing the potential to impact the lives of waiting patients in Canada and around the world.  


Dr. Jennie Haw is a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Health System Impact Postdoctoral Fellow. Working with Dr. Dana Devine (Chief Scientist, Canadian Blood Services) and Dr. Jessica Polzer (Associate Professor, Western University) the aim of her current project is to optimize cord blood donor recruitment for the national, public cord blood bank. As a sociologist, Jennie is interested in understanding health and health systems in relation to the individual and society. The Canadian Blood Services’ Lay Science Writing Competition provided an excellent opportunity to further develop her communication skills and expand the reach and impact of her research. Jennie spends her free time running on the many paths and trails in Ottawa and the surrounding areas. 

Image
Jennie Haw

Dr. Jennie Haw is a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Health System Impact Postdoctoral Fellow. Working with Dr. Dana Devine (Chief Scientist, Canadian Blood Services) and Dr. Jessica Polzer (Associate Professor, Western University) the aim of her current project is to optimize cord blood donor recruitment for the national, public cord blood bank. As a sociologist, Jennie is interested in understanding health and health systems in relation to the individual and society. The Canadian Blood Services’ Lay Science Writing Competition provided an excellent opportunity to further develop her communication skills and expand the reach and impact of her research. Jennie spends her free time running on the many paths and trails in Ottawa and the surrounding areas. 


The 2018 Canadian Blood Services Lay Science Writing Competition was organized by the Canadian Blood Services’ Centre for Innovation with welcome support from Science Borealis and the Centre for Blood Research at the University of British Columbia. 

Winning science research writers announced


Friday, April 05, 2019

To give our research trainees an opportunity to showcase their research, while honing their writing skills, Canadian Blood Services teamed-up with Science Borealis and the Centre for Blood Research, to launch our first-ever Lay Science Writing Competition.


“It’s important for researchers to be able to explain what they do in an engaging and understandable manner to those who don’t work in research. This competition is a great opportunity for trainees to hone their skills in public science communication.”

Dr. Dana Devine

Canadian Blood Services Chief Scientist


Whether it was the chance to be published or the prizes, many trainees responded to the challenge, submitting entries that reflect a breadth of research in blood, plasma, stem cells, and organs and tissues. Within the competition theme of “Research that matters”, each entry was to describe the impact of their individual or lab’s research on the transfusion and transplantation system and/or on our society. A jury of professional communicators and scientists was given the challenging task of reviewing and judging the submissions on their writing and storytelling merits, assigning a ranking and selecting the top 3 science research writers.

…and the winners of the 2019 Lay Science Writing Competition are:

Image
Winners Lay Science Writing Competition 2019

Our sincere congratulations to all!


“The competition provided an excellent opportunity to further develop my communication skills and expand the reach and impact of my research.”

Dr. Jennie Haw,

Image
Jennie Haw

1st prize winner, CIHR Health Systems Impact fellow and Canadian Blood Services researcher: Dr. Jennie Haw


Over the coming weeks, we’ll share each of the prize-winning entries on the R.E.D blog, so watch this space to learn more about these budding writers and their research.

The 2018 Canadian Blood Services Lay Science Writing Competition was organized by the Canadian Blood Services’ Centre for Innovation with welcome support from Science Borealis and the Centre for Blood Research at the University of British Columbia.


Looking back on 2018: Top-five most-read stories from the RED blog


Tuesday, January 01, 2019

As the year comes to a close and 2019 is set to begin, we take a moment to reflect on the 2018 articles that were among the most popular.

#5: Raising awareness for living organ donation

In April each year, we honour organ donors and their families during National Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness Week and encourage Canadians to consider organ donation, register their intent to donate, and discuss their wishes with families. This article focuses on raising awareness for living organ donation and was published in November on Giving Tuesday.

Kidney transplantation is life-saving and life-altering. Until we can clone or grow or print kidneys (who knows what the future holds), there will continue to be a need for kidney transplants. Transplantation through living donation has the potential to remove many people from dialysis and the transplant waitlists and alter the lives of not just the patients, but their families as well.”
– Kathy Yetzer, Associate Director, Living Donation, Canadian Blood Services.

Read more

 

#4: Meet the Researcher: Dr. Elisabeth Maurer

For the last few years, we’ve been fortunate to conduct interviews with our staff and adjunct scientists in this series of blog posts titled “Meet the Researcher…” This interview with Dr. Elizableth Maurer was number 4 on our most-read list.

"It is my vision that my work could improve the lives of others — if screening platelets could help reduce the number of patients who do not respond as well as hoped to platelet transfusion, and save more lives, this would be very rewarding.”" ~ Dr. Elisabeth Maurer, adjunct scientist, Canadian Blood Services

Read more

 

#3 In the news: UBC research brings us one step closer to universal blood

Exciting research from the University of British Columbia could make it easier to match blood to patients, by turning all blood into type O, the universal donor. This work was presented earlier in 2018 at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in Boston, and created quite a buzz. We chatted wit our Chief Scientist, Dr. Dana Devine, and  Dr. Jayachandran Kizhakkedathu to learn more about this exciting advance.

Read more

 

Our top two blog posts are related to blood donor eligibility criteria and the research program that is working toward evolving the eligibility criteria for men who have sex with men.

#2 MSM Research Grant Program launches second funding competition

The objective of the MSM Research Grant Program is to ensure the generation of adequate evidence-based research for alternative screening approaches for blood or plasma donors, which could evolve the current eligibility criteria for MSM while maintaining the safety of the blood supply. The program is administered by Canadian Blood Services and Héma-Québec with funding support from Health Canada.

Read more 

#1 The evolution of a donor deferral policy: where do we go from here?

Dr. Mindy Goldman, medical director at Canadian Blood Services, along with coauthors Dr. Dana Devine and Dr. Sheila O’Brien also from Canadian Blood Services and Dr. Andrew Shih with the Vancouver General Hospital,  published a review article in the scientific journal Vox Sanguinis, titled Donor deferral policies for men who have sex with men: past, present and future. This blog post provides an overview of the publication.

Read more

For the latest on this topic, an update on the MSM Research Program was published in December 2018

Thank you for reading about Research, Education and Discovery at Canadian Blood Services. We look forward to reporting on more exciting science, researchers and innovations in 2019 related to blood, plasma, stem cells, and organs and tissues. Happy New Year!

Image
Happy New Year

Canadian Blood Services – Driving world-class innovation

Through discovery, development and applied research, Canadian Blood Services drives world-class innovation in blood transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation—bringing clarity and insight to an increasingly complex healthcare future. Our dedicated research team and extended network of partners engage in exploratory and applied research to create new knowledge, inform and enhance best practices, contribute to the development of new services and technologies, and build capacity through training and collaboration. Find out more about our research impact

The opinions reflected in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Canadian Blood Services nor do they reflect the views of Health Canada or any other funding agency.

Unleash your inner writer – Enter our first-ever lay science writing competition


Thursday, November 15, 2018

Use plain language to tell the story of your research in blood, plasma, stem cells or organs & tissues.

Call for submissions – Deadline: January 18, 2019

Theme: Research that matters!

We’re excited to announce the launch of Canadian Blood Services’ first-ever Lay Science Writing Competition. We’ve connected with key partners in the science writing and research communities (Science Borealis and the Centre for Blood Research) to host a competition that will put your plain language writing skills to the test. 

Submissions are open to members of the Canadian Blood Services extended research trainee network including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and research associates directly or indirectly supported by Canadian Blood Services.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to showcase to the public your research in the domain of blood, plasma, stem cells, or organs and tissues and take an exciting new step in the development of your vital communication skills…. Not to mention the opportunity to win a prize and get published. 

This year’s Competition theme is “Research that matters!”. Your entry must describe the impact of your (your lab’s) research on the transfusion and transplantation system and/or on our society. The work must be original, in English, and not previously published. Length of submission must not exceed 800 words. 

Canadian Blood Services will convene a jury to review and rank the submissions. Submissions will be judged on their writing and storytelling merits.

Image
lay science writing competition poster 2018

The winning writer will receive a $300 prize and the two runners-up will each receive a $100 prize. Selected entries will be disseminated through the Canadian Blood Services, Science Borealis and the Centre for Blood Research online platforms and social media channels.

Good luck!!

Find out more about the competition and download the competition guidelines

If you have questions, contact the Centre for Innovation by email at centreforinnovation@blood.ca 

Presented in partnership with the Centre for Blood Research and Science Borealis. 


Canadian Blood Services – Driving world-class innovation

Through discovery, development and applied research, Canadian Blood Services drives world-class innovation in blood transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation—bringing clarity and insight to an increasingly complex healthcare future. Our dedicated research team and extended network of partners engage in exploratory and applied research to create new knowledge, inform and enhance best practices, contribute to the development of new services and technologies, and build capacity through training and collaboration. Find out more about our research impact

The opinions reflected in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Canadian Blood Services nor do they reflect the views of Health Canada or any other funding agency.

 

Funding opportunities currently open


Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Canadian Blood Services' Centre for Innovation currently has four competitive funding competitions open for applications. All close on November 30, 2018. Read on to see if you or any of your colleagues or students are eligible for these exciting opportunities!

Canadian Blood Services' Graduate Fellowship Program

The Graduate Fellowship Program provides stipend support for young investigators who want to initiate or continue training in the field of blood transfusion and transplantation science. The maximum value of each fellowship is $25,000 per annum, with an additional travel allowance of $1,000 per year. Students may be supported for up to four years. Graduate students undertaking full-time research training in a Canadian institution are eligible to apply.

Learn more about the Canadian Blood Services Graduate Fellowship Program:
Graduate Fellowship Program: Fostering the future of transfusion science research

BloodTechNet Award Program

BloodTechNet seeks to support your bright idea! Funding is available for projects that deliver innovative educational tools and resources to support the development of skills, knowledge and expertise of health professionals in the transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation communities in Canada. Applicants must be a health professional belonging to the transfusion, cellular therapy and/or transplantation communities in Canada.

Learn more about current and previously funded projects through this Program:

James Kreppner Award

This award supports research into the legal and regulatory aspects of donation, collection, storage, and use of blood, blood products, and hematopoietic stem cells; and organ and tissue donation and transplantation. The award honours James Kreppner, a lawyer and patients’ rights advocate, who was committed to blood safety and contributed greatly to Canada’s blood system. Applicants must be a Canadian legal researcher affiliated with a Canadian academic program as a faculty member.

Learn more about previous recipients:

Kenneth J. Fyke Award

This award supports health services and policy research to promote the development of evidence-based Canadian practices and policies in blood transfusion, blood stem cell transplantation, and organ and tissue transplantation for the benefit of Canadian patients. This award honours Kenneth J Fyke, one of Canada’s healthcare leaders and a world authority on healthcare management. Applicants must be Canadian researchers affiliated with a Canadian academic program related to health services or health policy or transfusion medicine, stem cell transplantation, or organ and tissue donation and transplantation medicine.

Learn more about previous recipients: A Q & A with Dr. David Allan


Canadian Blood Services – Driving world-class innovation

Through discovery, development and applied research, Canadian Blood Services drives world-class innovation in blood transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation—bringing clarity and insight to an increasingly complex healthcare future. Our dedicated research team and extended network of partners engage in exploratory and applied research to create new knowledge, inform and enhance best practices, contribute to the development of new services and technologies, and build capacity through training and collaboration. Find out more about our research impact

The opinions reflected in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Canadian Blood Services nor do they reflect the views of Health Canada or any other funding agency.

 

Meet the Director: Dr. Chantale Pambrun


Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Get to know Dr. Chantale Pambrun, Director, Canadian Blood Services’ Centre for Innovation

Previously led by Judie Leach Bennett, who  joined the executive management team as Vice-President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, Dr. Chantale Pambrun took over as Director of the Centre for Innovation in December 2017. She was formerly associate director, donor and clinical services and, prior to joining us at Canadian Blood Services, she was the Medical Director of Hematopathology at a tertiary health care centre for women and children in Halifax, NS.

Image
Dr. Chantale Pambrun

To get to know Dr. Pambrun better, we asked her a few questions…

Tell us a little about yourself… Who are you? Where are you from?

Canada has always been my home. My husband, two children and I have lived in many cities from coast to coast. Our nomad-like existence has made us adaptable and open to new experiences. Much of what drives me in my life and in my career is related to being a positive role model to my children. Each and every day, I strive to contribute to the best of my ability, so that I may inspire them to do the same.

How long have you been with Canadian Blood Services?

I first started with Canadian Blood Services in 2016 as a medical consultant working with Dr. Mindy Goldman in Donor and Clinical Services, which later expanded into an associate medical director role with responsibilities in donor eligibility and the national immunohematology reference laboratory. Donor health is an issue I consider very important in our work and I continue to support work in this area.

Read more: Dr. Pambrun on donor health

 

Tell us about your role with the Centre for Innovation…

In my role as Director of the Centre for Innovation, I work with a team of approximately 80 individuals who each hold a unique set of skills. Collectively the group helps Canadian Blood Services prepare for the future of transfusion and transplantation medicine, all for the benefit of donors and patients. Broadly the group works on discovery research related, applied development, knowledge mobilization and education, as well as health policy and leading practice.

As director, I’m responsible for making sure the team has what they need to succeed. I am very keen on fostering collaboration within our group, across the organization and beyond to the broader science and healthcare community.

Image
discovery research on display during ISBT 2018

 

Before working at Canadian Blood Services, what was the most unusual or interesting job you’ve ever had? 

Once upon a time, I worked at the Chrysler minivan plant in Windsor, Ontario. I spent all day installing van doors – the same tedious task, day after day. That experience taught me that I was not built for an assembly line job. I prefer the challenge of a day that has at least a few surprises and puzzles to solve.

What drew you to Canadian Blood Services originally? 

I was drawn to the organization because it provided an opportunity to do meaningful work in a field with many diverse stakeholders. I knew early on that I wouldn’t run out of things to do and that no day would ever be dull…

What do you like most about your job?

The people, the passion, and the cause. I love the diversity of what the Centre for Innovation does and what the group is able to achieve when we work together.

What do you find most exciting about your work?

I enjoy uncovering the untapped opportunities; seeing the team flourish in their day-to-day work; and challenging the status quo.

Read more: Searching for safer red blood cell bags for pediatric patients

What/who inspires you?

I am inspired by people who do what’s right, who are authentic, who are passionate and who engage those around them. 

When you’re not at work, where could we find you?

I most enjoy relaxing with my family, doing the simple things and enjoying life.

Tell us something about yourself that would surprise us... 

I’m a cowgirl at heart. I’ve always loved the great outdoors and love riding horses. After medical school I went on a cattle drive with my father in Montana… it was a long-time dream of ours. The simplicity of this life and the big open spaces is something I long for.

Image
Dr. Chantale Pambrun - leisure

Three words that best describe you:

Enthusiastic, pragmatic, and optimistic. I always try to come to any table with an open mind and try to put a positive spin on whatever the challenge…

You’re happiest when? 

When I am true to myself.

Learn more about Canadian Blood Services' Centre for Innovation and ongoing research and education initiatives


Canadian Blood Services – Driving world-class innovation

Through discovery, development and applied research, Canadian Blood Services drives world-class innovation in blood transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation—bringing clarity and insight to an increasingly complex healthcare future. Our dedicated research team and extended network of partners engage in exploratory and applied research to create new knowledge, inform and enhance best practices, contribute to the development of new services and technologies, and build capacity through training and collaboration. Find out more about our research impact

The opinions reflected in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Canadian Blood Services nor do they reflect the views of Health Canada or any other funding agency.

 

Do you suffer from FOMO?


Tuesday, October 02, 2018

Do you suffer from FOMO? Fear of missing out! Fear no more, the event page on Canadian Blood Services' professional education website has you covered!

This is your one-stop shop to learn more about local, national and international education events covering blood, plasma and transfusion, organ and tissue donation and transplantation, as well as hematopoietic stem cells. Here you’ll find a searchable and easy-to-view calendar of conferences, lectures, courses and more.

Check it out! Be THAT person – the one who never misses an abstract deadline or early bird registration rate!

And - to event planners and those in the know - please let us know if we are the ones missing out! If you would like YOUR event displayed on our calendar, please contact us

 

Image
Left to right: Drs. William Sheffield, Jeff Keirnan, and Mia Golder. Photo credit: CSTM 2017 photo gallery.
CSTM annual meeting

 

Image
poster session ISBT
ISBT 2018 poster session

 

Image
CBR event
Centre for Blood Research event (photo courtesy of CBR)

Canadian Blood Services – Driving world-class innovation

Through discovery, development and applied research, Canadian Blood Services drives world-class innovation in blood transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation—bringing clarity and insight to an increasingly complex healthcare future. Our dedicated research team and extended network of partners engage in exploratory and applied research to create new knowledge, inform and enhance best practices, contribute to the development of new services and technologies, and build capacity through training and collaboration. Find out more about our research impact

The opinions reflected in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Canadian Blood Services nor do they reflect the views of Health Canada or any other funding agency.

 

Meet the Researcher: Dr. Jelena Holovati


Tuesday, September 04, 2018

This week, we connected with Dr. Jelena Holovati about her work as a Canadian Blood Services adjunct scientist and her role as laboratory director of the Edmonton Stem Cell Manufacturing Program.

Where do you work and what is your role?

I’m an associate professor in the department of laboratory medicine and pathology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. I also hold Canadian Blood Services positions as a laboratory director for the Edmonton Stem Cell Manufacturing Program and as an adjunct scientist. By training, I'm a lab technologist – this background has served me really well in my current roles. 

How long have you been with Canadian Blood Services?

Image
Dr. Jelena Holovati

Since my undergraduate years at the University of Alberta! I was first introduced to Canadian Blood Services  in 2002, as a lab technology student working on a validation project in component production. This experience led me to the graduate program, during which I was supervised by two Canadian Blood Services’ scientists, Drs. McGann and Acker. My PhD thesis focused on innovative ways to cryopreserve red blood cells and I am grateful to have been supported by a Canadian Blood Services graduate fellowship award.

After I completed my PhD, I accepted a faculty position at the University of Alberta and started focusing my academic and professional interests in the fields of transfusion and transplantation medicine. I was so happy to be invited to join Canadian Blood Services as an adjunct scientist. Now I supervise graduate students working on Canadian Blood Services’ funded projects — so in a way I feel I have come full circle!

“Seeing all the wonderful things undergraduate and graduate students end up doing after I’ve had the privilege of mentoring and supporting them, even for a short while, makes me feel like I’m contributing to the development of tomorrow’s laboratory medicine leaders and visionaries.”

Tell us about your areas of research…

My primary research focuses on investigating innovative approaches to improve the red blood cell membrane during blood bank storage. The ultimate goal is to further improve the safety and quality of red blood cells for transfusion. For example, we are currently studying how to use liposomes — small membrane-bound vesicles — to mitigate red blood cell membrane damage that occurs during storage, and investigating the effects of a rejuvenating solution on the quality of stored red blood cells.

As laboratory director of the Edmonton Stem Cell Manufacturing Program, I am involved in multiple development, validation, and quality improvement projects in the hematopoietic stem cell laboratory. For example, in March 2017, we were the first lab in Canada to implement an automated process for plasma reduction during processing of hematopoietic stem cells, a change which improved stem cell product quality and safety for the patient.

What are you working on now?

Apart from my research work, during the university semester, I’m quite busy with teaching, marking midterms and sitting on candidacy exams. As an educator in the division of the medical laboratory science at the University of Alberta, I am involved in education and training of medical laboratory science and medical undergraduate students, residents, as well as MSc and PhD students in the graduate laboratory medicine program.

Learn more about Dr. Holovati’s recent research to improve the usefulness of a laboratory assay that can help find suitable blood donors for hard-to-match patients here.

Why did you get into science?

I was always drawn to health sciences, and it was actually a course in clinical microbiology that led me to study medical laboratory technology, which was such a perfect fit for me! I love the technical and analytical aspects of the lab, but knowing that there is a direct contribution to patient care makes it even more rewarding. 

What inspires you?

My students inspire me. Continuously rediscovering medical laboratory science through their eyes is just delightful! Also, seeing all the wonderful things these undergraduate and graduate students end up doing after I’ve had the privilege of mentoring and supporting them for, even for a short while, makes me feel like I’m contributing to the development of tomorrow’s laboratory medicine leaders and visionaries.

When you’re not in the lab, where could we find you?

In a car, driving my two girls around to numerous after-school activities — it often feels like I have a part time job as their private Uber driver. Also, I recently discovered hot yoga and I’m really enjoying this practice. 

 

Thumbnail

Canadian Blood Services – Driving world-class innovation

Through discovery, development and applied research, Canadian Blood Services drives world-class innovation in blood transfusion, cellular therapy and transplantation—bringing clarity and insight to an increasingly complex healthcare future. Our dedicated research team and extended network of partners engage in exploratory and applied research to create new knowledge, inform and enhance best practices, contribute to the development of new services and technologies, and build capacity through training and collaboration. Find out more about our research impact

The opinions reflected in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Canadian Blood Services nor do they reflect the views of Health Canada or any other funding agency.

Book your donation