Hospitals

Breadcrumb trail

Need Help or want to give your feedback?

Whether you’re having trouble with your account, or would like to make a suggestion, Canadian Blood Services offers you quick and convenient options to troubleshoot or get in touch. Contact us via live chat, consult our FAQ, send an email feedback@blood.ca, or give us a call at 1 888 2 DONATE (1-888-236-6283).

Component Types

Canadian Blood Services provides the hospitals it serves with several different types of blood components. Each type of blood component is intended to meet a particular patient’s clinical need. These blood components include red blood cells, platelets and plasma.

Red Blood Cells

Red Blood Cells, Leukocytes Reduced, is a red cell concentrate manufactured from approximately 480 ml of donor whole blood collected in 70 ml of citrate phosphate dextrose (CPD) anticoagulant. The red blood cells are separated by centrifugation and leukocyte reduced by filtration. The final red blood cell component contains a maximum of 29 ml of plasma from the original whole blood donation, and is suspended in 110 ml of saline adenine glucose manitol (SAGM) additive solution.

Platelets

Platelets can be collected by two collection methods:


Pooled Platelets, Leukocytes Reduced, is a platelet concentrate manufactured by centrifugation and separation of the buffy coat layer (named for its pale ‘buff’ colour) from approximately 480 ml of donor whole blood collected in 70 ml of CPD anticoagulant. Four ABO matched platelet concentrates are pooled with the plasma from one of the same four donations (male donor). The pooled platelets are then centrifuged a second time and the platelet rich plasma is extracted from the residual red blood cells, and the pooled platelets are leukocyte reduced by filtration.


Apheresis Platelets is a platelet concentrate collected into approximately 50 ml of anticoagulant citrate dextrose formula A (ACD-A) using automated apheresis techniques, which includes leukoreduction. This method is used predominately for collection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) or human platelet antigen (HPA) matched platelets to meet specific patient requirements.

Plasma

Plasma is the protein rich liquid portion of blood, and there are a few different types. Plasma components are stored frozen to preserve levels of certain coagulation proteins that are not stable when stored for prolonged periods at 1-6oC.

Frozen plasma is manufactured from whole blood collected in approximately 70 ml of CPD anticoagulant, centrifuged and then separated from the red blood cells and buffy coat. The plasma is frozen within 24 hours of collection.

Apheresis fresh frozen plasma is collected into 70-90 ml of either trisodium citrate anticoagulant or anticoagulant citrate dextrose formula A (ACD-A) using automated apheresis techniques. The plasma is frozen within eight hours of collection.

Cryosupernatant plasma is manufactured from slowly thawed frozen plasma that is centrifuged to separate the plasma from the insoluble proteins. The supernatant plasma is removed and refrozen.

Cryoprecipitate is manufactured from slowly thawed frozen plasma that is centrifuged to separate the insoluble proteins from the plasma. The insoluble protein portion is refrozen in approximately 5 ml of the plasma.

For further details on any of our blood components, see our Circular of Information.

Blood Component Costs

Contact your local Hospital Liaison Specialist for a copy of our most recent blood component costs.